Close to 600 children under the protection of SAMU

The massive arrival of immigrants in small boats to the Andalusian coast in recent years has put all the social entities involved in this phenomenon on alert, among them the SAMU Foundation, which currently hosts about 560 minors who have arrived clandestinely to Spain without being accompanied by an adult. These are distributed among the 16 different centers available to the organization. On the one hand, the so-called Temporary Emergency Accommodation Units or Immediate Care centers, and, on the other, the Basic Residential Care centers. Most of them come from Morocco, although there are also children from Guinea, Senegal, Mali and Ivory Coast.

Irregular immigration has more than doubled so far this year compared to the figures of 2017, which were alarming then. Spain is already the main access route to Europe, surpassing Italy. Up to the 15th of July, the irregular immigrants who had entered this year in Spain, mostly by sea and on the coast of Andalusia, already numbered 15,686, according to data from the Ministry of the Interior —the European agency Frontex raises this to 18,016 for the same period—, 114% more than in 2017, when the figure had already increased by 170%.

Many of these immigrants are unaccompanied foreign minors. In the first seven months of 2018, some 3,200 unaccompanied foreign minors came to Andalusia through its shores, a thousand of them in July alone, compared to 2,855 in all of last year, according to data from the Andalusian Government.

This year, the SAMU Foundation, by order of the Board, has opened, as of yet, 11 new resources aimed at this group. Two of them are Basic Residential Care centers, and the rest are Immediate Care centers.

The last two emergency temporary shelter resources were opened in August in Guillena (Seville) and Jimena (Cádiz). In addition to these, there are two more in the province of Cádiz open this year and two more in 2017, two in the province of Almeria, and three in that of Granada, all of them active from this year.

In terms of Basic Residential Care resources, which allow minors to remain at the center until children reach legal adulthood, SAMU has three resources in Seville, Granada and Cadiz. The last of them was set up in El Bosque, in the province of Cádiz, at the end of May. It was born from a need of the General Direction of Childhood and Families of the Board to address the needs of minors who arrived in Spain during the year 2017 and were still being cared for in Immediate Care centers. There are 13 people who work here, among them psychologists, social workers, educators, teachers, and edudational technical assistants.

“The key objective of the Basic Residential Care centers is to insert these children into society. Our role is one of social and professional guidance that starts with the task of documenting the minors, placing them in educational centers or in different courses and working with them towards their future emancipation,” indicates Nicolas Torres, director of SAMU minors.

All these resources add up to two more instruments in Motril (Granada), a Center of Social/ Professional Orientation, opened in 2013, and a floor for children who have been under the guardianship of SAMU and who have already reached legal age.

La Caixa Foundation donates € 10,000 TO SAMU Foundation to assist in their reconstruction mission in Nepal

La Caixa Social Work has donated € 10,000 to the SAMU Foundation, contributing to SAMU’s mission in Nepal. They have been present at the signing of Insausti July D. Bono, Director of the Business Center of the Caixa and Dr. Carlos Alvarez Leiva, President of SAMU, who thanked Caixa for their support of the SAMU Foundation.

This donation will help rebuild an orphanage and create an assistance campaign for children of the orphanage and for populations in the surrounding areas. Therefore, SAMU will create an advanced medical area to help those in need. 

On May 11, the first team of SAMU health professionals left for Kathmandu with 300 kg in humanitarian necessities. 
With 5,500 units donated by Menarini Group analgesics of Spain and 300 kg of medical equipment, the SAMU team will help the wounded and the refugees of the recent earthquakes in Nepal.

SAMU sent the first medical personnnel and equipment to Kathmandu

Our first team left on Monday for Kathmandu with 6 toilets and 300 kg in humanitarian action.

About 5,500 units donated by Menarini Group analgesics Spain, together with 300 kg of medical supplies, equipment SAMU takes to help the wounded and refugees of the earthquakes that have recently taken place in Nepal. This work will target victims at increased risk such as children, orphans, disabled and chronically, especially vulnerable.

The director of the School of Emergency SAMU, Juan Gonzalez, said “these drugs are vital in the area, since its analgesic capacity is very suitable for aiding the injuries caused by catastrophes: fractures, amputations, crushing, etc … Our medical equipment is first intervention drugs, generators, multifunctional elements, transmissions and logistical resources Primea.”

Dr. Carlos Alvarez Leiva, president of SAMU, said that “our work in other missions such as the Philippines, Haiti, Indonesia, etc … has been to restore destroyed hospitals, attend to the wounded, provide babysitting, classify patients, offer primary care, and improve pediatric healthcare … with strict control of our actions under the guidance of the UN. “

“Our professionals, doctors, nurses, technicians, and pharmacists are specially trained to work in conditions of austerity, in impossible scenarios, have a balanced psychological profile and are prepared to face uncertainties. Our team’s skills go beyond just providing assistance: we are also experts in health organization and logistics”, says Carlos Alvarez.

The third contingent sent to the Philippines continues saving lives

The third contingent of Fundacion Samu sent to the Philippines came to value a man who as volunteers of the NGO commented Gualandi Volunteer Service Programme, working in the area (San Remigio, Cebu), had 16 subject tied to a tree and unaware of the motif.

When the team arrived to the area to assess it, this man was in the middle of the jungle with a foot trapped between two logs that allowed him to move but not be straight. The physical examination was normal and noted that he was careful as the mother would wash him and gave him water and rice.

After assessing the man named Ben, volunteers met with the family to find out why Ben’s behavior. The story told by family and behaviors Ben was diagnosed with schizophrenia and was prescribed a treatment that the NGO will provide.

He was taken to hospital where he spent the night and was discharged with medication. He is currently with his family at home that volunteers have rebuilt since it was damaged by the typhoon.

Maria Dolores Romero, SAMU psychiatrist, says that “the reason why the family was tied by ignorance and fear of the attitude that was showing Ben. In countries like the Philippines, especially in disadvantaged areas, there is no adequate mental health care and a significant lack of knowledge about mental illnesses that make people with a mental disorder are in inhuman conditions.”

International Meeting Crisis Management and Disaster in Curitiba, Brazil

Samu International in association with The Chains Group held the day 6-8 February in Curitiba: “The International Meeting on Crisis and Disaster Management”.

The aim is to encourage debate about the importance of prior organization to crises and disasters. This meeting will feature lectures, theoretical and practical courses, also will be launched in the Brazilian country in the second edition of the book by Dr. Carlos Alvarez Leiva: “Atendimento de Saúde em to Multiple Frames vitimas and Disasters”.

Dr. Alvarez Leiva made two free and open to the public about the book and the management structure of global crisis brought to Brazil for the event talks.

The course content will include: Risk Management, a systematic view, introduction to crisis management, health teams in events and disasters, the role of universities in scientific research on disasters and major events, disaster medicine, hospital and disasters and crisis cabinet and SCI.

About the World Cup, the president of Samu stressed the ability to mobilize the Brazilian people. “The people of this country is prestativa solidarity and an event with these proportions is the opportunity to improve the care and services they need to integrate and prioritize an organization and efficient logistics.

The SAMU team has participated in the rescue of a ferry in Santa Fe, Philippines, which has resulted in several injuries

The SAMU team participated in the rescue of a ferry in bad weather, he could not reach port.

After controlling the chaos caused by the nerves of the passengers, we proceeded to landing, with neither the captain nor the crew appeared throughout the operation.

When the landing was finalizing appeared the captain decided to return to port and sailed back to those who had already been evacuated. They reembarked passengers from the ground in an operation that was back uncoordinated but this time with the presence of the captain and the Coast Guard in the rescue. One of the vessels was about to re-embark, with too many people on board capsized some 50 meters from the boat, with passengers trying to hold on to the tack boat.

The situation became more dramatic after the turn of the vessel, but the speed of the Vbert volunteers and fishermen rescue craft, they had no problem jumping into the water at any height, made this incident was resolved in half an hour. A pregnant woman, a blind and a paraplegic girl who had respiratory problems and slight chest pain were attended, among others, the medical team SAMU.

The mayor has deeply grateful to the SAMU team the great work done throughout the rescue.